August 6, 2005

Blogging conspicuously in public.

Yesterday, the bloggers convened at a turquoise table near the window at Mother Fool's.

Mother Fool's

That yellow chair is for me. Nina was pensive and at one with the yellow and blue atmosphere:

Mother Fool's

Oscar maintained his pseudonymity as he lent Nina, Tonya, and me a hand in this public blogging effort:

Mother Fool's

8 comments:

Menlo Bob said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Menlo Bob said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Menlo Bob said...

Oftentimes businesses will pay celebrities to come to their store and hang around and greet customers. They advertise this to induce potential customers. The low rent version of this could well be your group of bloggers. You'd offer to blog for cash. Expect to spend most of your time explaining what a blog is.

Ann Althouse said...

I've pretty much given them a free ad, haven't I? They could always buy a BlogAd. I don't know why Madison caf├ęs and restaurants don't buy BlogAds here.

ploopusgirl said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
nina said...

It's interesting that cafes have not resisted laptops even though they frown on the use of cell phones and such. I know it is a different set of issues, but still, you can't imagine it's good for business to have people sit for a long time with their computers (as we did). Though you point to an indirect benefit - alerting others to the niceness of the place.

Pastor_Jeff said...

Nina,

Interesting point. I was at Starbucks for a while on Thursday doing some work on my laptop. It wasn't really crowded and I don't think anyone couldn't find a table because of me.

Was the place crowded at all? Did you feel you were taking up space the owner would rather have given to other people?

nina said...

Pastor Jeff:

Whether it was crowded then or not, I can certainly say that the cafe typically is packed. It's a real neighborhood hangout. I've been there where people are literally sitting on the floor (it being the on the funkier side of town).
Borders -- our big bookstore -- also has laptop users (including me) and that just seems wrong from the business perspective. Aren't you then crossing boundaries where it becomes almost like a library? (Though in truth, most laptop users are people doing homework).