September 17, 2005

"He did it with pride. And I'm glad my brother did it, with pride..."

So said the sister of Chai Vang, who now stands convicted of the murder of six hunters.
The 14 jurors - eight women and four men - who heard the case were chosen from Dane County after [Judge Norman] Yackel ordered the selection moved because of pretrial publicity and concern about anti- Hmong sentiment in the area. Some questioned the move, saying Madison liberals might be more likely to go easy on Vang, or wouldn't understand deer hunting issues.

J.B. Van Hollen, a Republican who in 2006 is challenging Attorney General Peg Lautenschlager, who prosecuted the case, tried to make those points an issue. Madison lawyers and judges, however, said such notions were simplistic and that evidence and proven facts usually sway the case.
Score one for the jury process.

11 comments:

Dirty Harry said...

That was fast! I was just in Waukesha last week and they were takling about the trial getting started. Maybe I misheard.

Finally watched all 13 episodes of "The Comeback." You were right, it started out a little slow -- tedious -- but as her character developed it became classic television. Lisa Kudrow is amazing.

PatCA said...

"The case ultimately came down to whom the jury believed among three men."

No, it was the evidence. 20 bullets, multiple wounds in the backs of the victims. Come on.

Pastor_Jeff said...

Harry,

No, I think you heard right. I believe the trial only lasted 5-6 days and the jury was out only three hours.

John A said...

He's been in this area over twenty years, is an avid and experienced hunter, and didn't know about not using a deer stand someone ekse put up? Got upset about some bad language? Tracked and back-shot a bunch of people? On the stand, said that even to him some of them did not deserve to be shot?

Golly, how could he possibly be found guilty?

lindsey said...

They just did a little blurb about this on CNN and there was some guy up there implying he was convicted because of racism. Eventually, no one's going to care if someone is accused of racism because so many have cried wolf.

P. Froward said...

The 14 jurors - eight women and four men

That's a funny way to get to fourteen isn't it?

peter hoh said...

Fourteen jurors: there were two alternates among the 14 jurors. After the closing arguments, some sort of lottery determined which twelve were going to deliberate.

Beldar said...

The quoted Madison lawyers and judges are right. They're not quite as common as waves lapping the shore, but rational jury verdicts in large numbers pretty much happen every business day in courtrooms all over America. There are thousands, probably tens of thousands, of them for every one O.J. or M.J. or first-Vioxx-case. It's not even a dog-bites-man occurrence, more of a "sun rose in the east again today" sort of deal. So yes, score [yet another] one [among zillions] for the jury process.

Timothy K. Morris said...

Dirty Harry - "That was fast!"

Well, by the standard set in California trials, sure. By the standard for typical Midwest/ Northcenteral trials, just about right. Based on what I know of the evidence, it'd probaly take five or six days in my county, too.

michael a litscher said...

Some questioned the move, saying Madison liberals might be more likely to go easy on Vang, or wouldn't understand deer hunting issues.

I plead guilty, and I throw myself upon the mercy of the blog.

Harkonnendog said...

That group of jurors shall henceforth be known as "The Masters of the Obvious."