November 24, 2005

Happy Thanksgiving!

Find some critter to eat.

The Enemy

17 comments:

Dad29 said...

The critter pictured is a fine snack for your local fox and/or coyote population, and requires NO preparation--simply shoot and toss into the nearest woodline.

Sharing and caring!

Palladian said...

THE ENEMY!

Happy Thanksgiving, Ann and all!

Looking forward to a post-Thanksgiving podcast this weekend!

DonSurber said...

Mmm, squirrel gravy. Good eats in Poca, WV

digital mule 2 said...

And in the mountains of NC. Here is a link to some recipes.
http://www.backwoodsbound.com/zsquir.html
I recommend the Smother - Fried Squirrel myself.

Meade said...

Then one day, [s]he was shootin' at some food,
An' out from her blog commenters come
a troubblin' stew...
Creutzfeldt-Jakob
dementia

Steven Taylor said...

Happy Thanksgiving, Ann.

The bird is already roasting, so I will skip the squirrel.

Thanks for the suggestion, however.

S

PatCA said...

Happy Thanksgiving to Ann and all the gang!

WhatsAPundit said...

Don't think I want to be eating me no Brooklyn squirrel. (Which is a shame, because I grew up eating squirrel fresh off the tree. But that was West Virginia, and I'm afraid we've got some bad nuts up here....)

Joan said...

The perfect Althousian Thanksgiving post! Have a great day, everyone!

Meade said...

Hunters annually bag about 1.5 million squirrels in Kentucky. Some people have also been known to cook up road kill squirrels, which concerns Berger. A crazed squirrel may be more likely to dash into traffic and get killed.

Exactly how many people eat the brains is not clear.

The menu for the 18th annual Slone Mountain Squirrel Festival in Floyd County last weekend did not include squirrel brains, or any other part of the squirrel for that matter.

``We don't even fix squirrel gravy anymore,'' said Otis Hicks, one of the organizers. ``We don't serve any wild animal whatsoever. The health department said they'd all have to be checked, so we just decided not to fool with it.''

Michael Ann Williams, who teaches food customs in a folklore program at Western Kentucky University, said some students can recall their parents eating squirrel brains, usually scrambled with eggs.

``I don't think I've had a student who said, `Oh yeah, I think squirrel brains are yummy myself,''' Ms. Williams said.


Think I'll have the turkey, thank you.

digital mule 2 said...

I remember Jacob, the youngest of the Creutzfeldt boys. A real nice family, just plain folks. But his middle name wasn't dementia I don't believe, that was the second boy, married Jake Ellis's third girl if I recall aright.

Jack said...

It was a tradition for my father and me to go squirrel hunting on Thanksgiving.

One year, we actually shot a squirrel, and a day later, I got to eat "squirrel and dumplings" which to my 8 year old palate tasted a lot like chicken and dumplings.

I wasn't a big fan of the blood involved with "dressing" the dead squirrel, though...

Finn Kristiansen said...

Sometimes I feel like that squirrel and walk through my life with the same look on my face. Something big and large, the weight of the world in a ball, is rolling towards me, and I see no escape, and say, "Eloi, Eloi, lama sabachthani".

I wonder if I will survive, or end up in the frying pan, and eaten to the bone.

Jacques Cuze said...

So now you're trying to pick a fight with Drew Curtis?

Asher Abrams said...

Happy Thanksgiving, Ann. Personally I skip the critters, but I'll be sure to enjoy. All the best to you and the family.

reader_iam said...

Heh. Is that the best squirrel you could catch?

We have a gourmet selection in our yard. Nyah! Nyah!

Yes, we have gray, red and even black ones from which to choose (and the occasional black one with a red tail, and vice versa; these are truly la creme de la creme).

Want I should ship a selection to you for the next Major Holiday? You could be the talk of your block.

Susan said...

Squirrels strike
back.