January 12, 2006

"Alito Says He'd Emulate O'Connor's Style."

So reads an AP headline, based on this statement: "I would try to emulate her dedication and her integrity and her dedication to the case-by-case process of adjudication." Does that mean anything or is it just routine polite acknowledgment? It could be read as a rejection of decisionmaking in the form of stating crisp rules at a high level of generality: "She has been known for her meticulous devotion to the facts of the particular cases that come before her and her belief that each case needs to be decided on its complex facts." Does he plan to emulate that or can we perceive that he sees that as a problem he will solve?

UPDATE: The NYT has a quite different headline: "Alito Resists Making Comparisons to O'Connor."

7 comments:

HaloJonesFan said...

It sounds like a response to Feinstein's comment about "exorable precedent".

Hee. "exorable". That's like saying that something is "pregnable".

Troy said...

I think it means he's going to wear a white doilie on his robe.

Jake said...

I think he is referring to the early O'Conner years, when it was a good description on how she judged.

Let us hope he is not referring to the later years when she changed from a judge of the law into a legislator.

Henry said...

Maybe he's taking up horseback riding. From now on, call him Slim Sam Alito from New Jersey.

LarryK said...

There's also the possibility that he was referring to Flannery O'Connor, and hereafter his legal opinions will contain footnotes from "Wise Blood" and "Everything that Rises Must Converge." OK, it's a long shot, but it would be an appropriately absurdist response to the questions he's endured...

Henry said...

LarryK -- Ha ha. I was thinking of Jeff Goldblum's New Jersey Cowboy character in Buckaroo Bonzai. Your crack is funnier.

LarryK said...

Henry W. - thanks. I'm actually a big fan of Flannery O'Connor's style, but imagine how "disturbed" and "concerned" the likes of Schumer, Durbin et al would be if Sam Alito's opinions were filled with images of O'Connor's grotesques. Come to think of it, that's probably not what we need in a Supreme Court justice.