February 18, 2006

The weekend.

I'm glad the peace of the weekend has arrived. It's been a very hectic week, even with Thursday spent snowed in. Yesterday was especially crazy: an early morning meeting with the real estate agent (involving writing a big check, which is always stressful even when you don't think you're feeling any stress), a conlaw class (reaching Marbury at long last), a noontime talk to the faculty (about the intersection between blogging and scholarship), a two-hour stint on a panel listening to and commenting on a talk by Texas lawprof Sanford Levinson (a great talk with a big turnout), and dinner with Levinson and others (good food and talk at the Madison Club).

Next week is a busy one too, including a Thursday trip to Milwaukee to participate in this Federalist Society conference on "The Legacy of the Rehnquist Court" (where I am a speaker, even though I'm not listed on that webpage).

Much as I'd like to take it easy this weekend, I've got to keep working on the project of getting the house ready to put on the market. I've gotten through the most difficult parts. Look how clean the basement is now:

The basement is clean!

But getting the obvious junk piles cleared only means that the smaller things become perceptible. Maybe I need to think up strategies for not getting swallowed up in housework. Like: don't do anything that has to do with moving as opposed to showing. Or maybe: pick one room a day and do everything and be done with it. But those rules won't work. The first one fritters away time in oversubtle line-drawing. And the second fails because I don't have enough days left. Yeah, yeah, I know. Stop talking about it. Stop thinking about it. Do it!

But first, I have to read the newspaper.

24 comments:

OhioAnne said...

Ever watch Sell this House on Sunday afternoons? (A&E?)

When you think that you have the room ready to go, then you know you need to take out half of what is left and put it in storage or otherwise dispose of it.

It's a fun show.

CB said...

Professor,
How is it that you are only now covering Marbury v. Madison in Con. law? I thought maybe you started with Article I, but even that would involve reading SCOTUS opinions that invalidate acts of Congress.
Just curious.

Ann Althouse said...

Haven't seen it, but I need a list of rules like that.

reader_iam said...

Good tips.

Plus potpourri (preferably that smells like a food--apple pie or something). I'm not kidding.

Diane said...

We moved this summer and after many fits and starts and wasted days I found the practice of one room a day worked best. The attic was the worst, but by sticking with it for two straight days it was finally emptied and that felt good.

knoxgirl said...

OhioAnne is right, those shows have all sorts of tips you'd never think about. Your house will look sterile to you, but much more appealing to the ave. buyer.

Ruth Anne Adams said...

Your clean basement reminds me of where the Partridge Family practiced.

I'm with RIA: baked bread on the counter.

Good for you to be able to write a "big check".

Ann Althouse said...

CB: It's not as though students can't conceive of judicial review without reading Marbury. There are many entry points. Some conlawprofs don't even teach Marbury -- and are adamant about leaving it out!

RogerA said...

Ohioanne is on it: get all of your personal memorabilia off the walls, put every knick knack into storage, simplify--when someone walks in, they want to envision THEIR house--your things detract from that. Clear off the counters, take all the pictures off the walls--give your buyers as much of a blank canvas as you can, and let them decide where they are going to put their stuff. Good luck.

Pete said...

Ann,

A "big check" to the realtor? Uh, don't they get paid at closing? Or is it different up in Wisconsin when you sell a huge house?

Ann Althouse said...

Pete: I have a contingency based on the sale of my house, which required me to put up a refundable 5%.

Ann Althouse said...

That is, it has to do with the purchase of the new place, not the sale of the house.

Pete said...

Ann,

Ah, that makes sense now. Sorry to be so ignorant.

Patrick said...

As a veteran of far too many moves, what kills you is the little things that look harmless until you start collecting them. They take longer than big things. Kitchens are the real stinkers to pack.

sonicfrog said...

So what happened to the awsome Sun Clock?

Ann Althouse said...

The awesome sun clock is hanging over the workbench right now.

Jennifer said...

Patirck - you're exactly, right. It's those little things that kill you. You think, oh I just have a few little things left. And, five hours of diligent work later, you STILL just have a few little things left.

Simon said...

Since I have no particular inclination to visit Milwaukee this time of year, will you give us a summary of your remarks either before or after the conference?

sonicfrog said...

I have a saw blade clock hanging over mine. It's good, but not as bitchin' as the sun clock.

Aspasia M. said...

Simon,

Why aren't you a law professor? You seem to really like analyzing the law. And the law professors get the nice offices in beautiful libraries.

After I attended a legal history conference, I understood why I am not going to be a law professor, ever. But it sounds like you would love it.

Simon said...

Geoduck,
I'll take that as a compliment, but I don't think I'm anywhere near the depth of knowledge and experience needed for that. You're right, it's something that'd be fun and interesting to me, but I'd be lying if I said I had the knowledge and the temperament to do it right now.

That doesn't mean I'm not going to criticize those who do it badly, on the other hand. ;)

Aspasia M. said...

You're right, it's something that'd be fun and interesting to me, but I'd be lying if I said I had the knowledge and the temperament to do it right now.

But once you had your J.D. you'd be ready to rock 'n roll!

Although, these things can be more fun as hobbies.

If I were as interested in the law as you were, I would dump my dissertation and head for the law school.

I am very envious of their offices and the library. And, when you teach law students, you're much less likely to deal with freshmen undergraduate nonsense. (Drunk for the 8:30 morning class, complaining about reading more then 10 pages a night, ect.)

Simon said...

Well, it's something that would be interesting in the future, but I hope it's something I'd only do if I was sure I could do the job well. Being a prof is a responsibility to the next generation, which is why I'm so contemptuous of those who (in my view) cross the line into outright indoctrination. It's one thing for, say, Randy Barnett, who I respect a great deal, and generally agree with, to write an academic paper saying "look, the ninth amendment protects unenumerated rights, and here's why", and quite another to be telling your students "look, the ninth amendment protects unenumerated rights, period." I wouldn't want to be the token conservative blowhard on the faculty is what I guess I'm saying. ;)

Plus, as you say, it's nice when it's an interest more thana career. I've really tried to take most of february "off", or at least, to change pace a little and focus on other things, which is harcer when you're deeply enmeshed in it every day.

The libraries are pretty enticing though...

Becky Jo said...

..., but I need a list of rules like that.

Here is just such a list, and a very good one too: http://www.ired.com/news/hejl/declutter.htm