December 8, 2006

Jeane J. Kirkpatrick.

RIP.
Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, R-Tenn., said that Kirkpatrick, who had a reputation as a blunt and acerbic advocate, "stood up for the interests of America while at the U.N., lent a powerful moral voice to the Reagan foreign policy and has been a source of wise counsel to our nation since leaving the government two decades ago. She will be greatly missed."

26 comments:

Fatmouse said...

Bill the Cat asks that in lieu of flowers, those wishing to pay respects make a donation to charity.

Anonymous said...

She was a woman of principle unafraid to speak the truth in halls where few were willing or able to.

Anonymous said...

(Aside of no consequence: Blogger finally solved the 14-day-old sign-in problem and one of my comments actually got posted!)

PatCA said...

A great lady.

Tim said...

Reading the report, it is clear the Washington Post considers her leading attributes "blunt and acerbic."

I suppose this is by way of reconfirming their opposition to any U.S. ambassador to the UN who, like Jeane Kirkpatrick or John Bolton, might be thought by the snakes nesting at the UN as "blunt and acerbic."

Too bad the likes of her could never be confirmed in our lifetimes. Her country was better for her; she'll be missed.

Anon Y. Mous said...

Of course the NYT doesn't even mention her most famous moment: her Blame America First speech to the 1984 Republican National Convention.

AJ Lynch said...

I find it foreboding and a little ominous that the ISG report was released the day before Pearl Harbor anniversary and Kilpatrick death.

David said...

Jeane Kirkpatrick;

History will record her as one of our greatest Americans who knew what she stood for, understood what America was about, and took her responsibility as a patriot seriously.

Duty! Honor! Country!

We are diminished as a country by her passing!

GOD SPEED!

Will said...

She won't be missed on this side of the Atlantic. Her support for Argentina's military dictatorship during the 1982 Falklands War was not appreciated.

Doyle said...

Is the hypertexted "RIP"... I don't know... glib or something?

Garage Mahal said...

She won't be missed on this side of the Atlantic. Her support for Argentina's military dictatorship during the 1982 Falklands War was not appreciated.

Probably not appreciated much in Guatemala, Nicarauga, Honduras, or El Salvador either.

bearbee said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
bearbee said...

She was a straight up lady. She pulled no punches.

We need more such as she......

MadisonMan said...

Who edited the NYTimes obit? She's called a blunt and acerbic advocate twice within three paragraphs.

Revenant said...

I'm sorry to hear that she's passed away. She was a good and effective diplomat.

Simon said...

Echo Revenant. :(

Molon_Labe_Lamp said...

Good Lady and a Great Diplomat. She will be missed.

Will, Don't kill the messenger, she was conveying the sentiments of her govt. I beleive Britain and the US were at odds over the Falklands. I think the US had offically denounced Britain's efforts to place sanctions on Argentina. I can't remember who it was, but somebody in the cabinet (Possibly SecDef Haig) alerted the Argentinian govt. to the coming invasion only hours before it occured.

At the time, the US viewed Britain's "meddling" in South American affairs as potentially dangerous because of the fears more SA countries would be pushed towards the Soviet Union for security assurances/military aide.

chickenlittle said...

A most unfunny woman (tunneling in from an adjacent thread).

She's just the sort of woman we need more of today. Some hope that her spirit one day reemerges as the most uncompromising wartime president of the US.

SteveR said...

Name another US UN Ambassador from prior to 1990. She was memorable for the right reason, in a body which is mostly forgettable.

Molon_Labe_Lamp said...

Oh I don't know, I think a guy by the name of A. Stevenson left his mark back in Octber '62

But I get your drift.

Anonymous said...

When I was young and partisan, Jeane Kirkpatrick bugged the hell out of me with her speech about "Blame America first." But now, with time, it's clear she was right. It's a huge aspect of our culture now. The practical result of the Vietnam syndrome was the total loss of confidence not just in our capabilities, but in our moral judgment. How dare we think our system is better than the Communists? How dare we speak of freedom and democracy? What about United Fruit and Guatemala? What about the Shah? What about the Phillippines? What about the way we treated the American Indians? And by the way, we really weren't so great during WWII! Hiroshima! Dresden!

There is a mistaken belief this syndrome died with the end of the Cold War, or with Gulf War I, but it didn't. There is also a mistaken belief that it is a purely Democratic Party illness, but I think there are lots of Republicans afflicted with it--James Baker for instance. Somehow, in his mind, the "deterioration" in Iraq is our fault. Why is that assumed to be so? Did we give these militias the idea that they should start killing each other? If you walk back the cat of Baker's POV, the original sin was ignoring the "realist" position that the bloodthirsty, genocidal outlaw Hussein was a boon to "stability." The U.S. had no opportunity to make it better.

What I'd've rather seen is a thorough, brutal critique of the Bush Administration's mistakes in Iraq. I don't think our weak position there was at all inevitable. But that's what Baker & co. think.

Anonymous said...

When I was young and partisan, Jeane Kirkpatrick bugged the hell out of me with her speech about "Blame America first." But now, with time, it's clear she was right. It's a huge aspect of our culture now. The practical result of the Vietnam syndrome was the total loss of confidence not just in our capabilities, but in our moral judgment. How dare we think our system is better than the Communists? How dare we speak of freedom and democracy? What about United Fruit and Guatemala? What about the Shah? What about the Phillippines? What about the way we treated the American Indians? And by the way, we really weren't so great during WWII! Hiroshima! Dresden!

There is a mistaken belief this syndrome died with the end of the Cold War, or with Gulf War I, but it didn't. There is also a mistaken belief that it is a purely Democratic Party illness, but I think there are lots of Republicans afflicted with it--James Baker for instance. Somehow, in his mind, the "deterioration" in Iraq is our fault. Why is that assumed to be so? Did we give these militias the idea that they should start killing each other? If you walk back the cat of Baker's POV, the original sin was ignoring the "realist" position that the bloodthirsty, genocidal outlaw Hussein was a boon to "stability." The U.S. had no opportunity to make it better.

What I'd've rather seen is a thorough, brutal critique of the Bush Administration's mistakes in Iraq. I don't think our weak position there was at all inevitable. But that's what Baker & co. think. America can only stir it bad.

Anonymous said...

sorry for the double-post. I'm not sure whether it's the new google beta or my computer, but it's been a drag trying to post on here today.

ignacio said...

I found her elucidation of "totalitarian" vs "authoritarian" very enlightening and it continues to be proven true in the real world.

Gary Rosen said...

Daniel Patrick Moynihan in the '70s was also a notable UN ambassador - much in the same mold as Kirkpatrick, in fact. She was a great American who will be sorely missed.

cokaygne said...

Stevenson is remembered because he got religion when the Kennedys showed him the pics of the Soviet buildup in Cuba.

It is obvious why Moynihan and Kirkpatrick are the other two who left an impression by their service at the UN. Perhaps Bolton will be another.

The UN is not some kind of mystical world congress. It is simply an organization where all governments, from Nauru to the US are represented and treated equally. The UN does not care how those governments got into power and happily salutes butchers and mountebanks as "honorable and esteemed representatives" of the democratic peoples republic of Turdistan.

good thing about the UN is that it is a place for these tyrants to pursue their ends in a somewhat peaceful manner. Stevenson, Moynihan, Kirkpatrick, and perhaps Bolton respected that but were not afraid to point out some of the backsliding.