February 20, 2007

What is more charming than artists drawing sculptures?

Drawing

Drawing

At the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC, Sunday.

13 comments:

Peter Palladas said...

Nothing to do with statues, but thought you might be interested in this if you haven't seen it:

JFK new footage

George said...

Looks like the kid's drawing a picture of a vomit-stained wall.

Art is where you find it.

PC said...

"What is more charming than artists drawing sculptures?"

I don't know; photographers taking pictures of art and publishing them on widely-read websites without the permission of the copyright holder?

Ann Althouse said...

PC: ??? I took the pictures. I give myself permission to publish them.

Ann Althouse said...

Or are you suggesting that these sculptures are still covered by copyright? (Because that's really funny!)

Slocum said...

Or are you suggesting that these sculptures are still covered by copyright?

And even if they were still under copyright the situation regarding photographs is far from clear:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia_talk:Copyright_FAQ

And it would seem, too, that in those situations where photographic 'reproductions' of sculptures would violate copyright, so too, would artistic reproductions, no?

And this is pretty interesting:

http://www.photopermit.org/?p=65

Will Chicago really get away with trying to enforce copyright on a city park?!

Bo Steed said...

PC: you might want to stick with family law.

PC said...

I wasn't suggesting that the sculptures in this post were still covered by copyright, but was playing the odds that some of what you've photographed and posted in the last few days isn't yet in the public domain. I don't know enough about art to know if this is definitively the case for any of the works you've shot.

PC said...

Bo: Thanks for the sentiment, but I dropped out of law school after the first year. My colleagues think I'm nuts, but I know I made the right decision.

Madison Guy said...

How about artists folding sculptures, like Robert J. Lang’s incredible origami arthropods: Is Mother Nature an origami artist? There's a wonderful metaphorical resonance in the connection between Lang’s abstract, geometric folding patterns and the models of insects and other living things they generate, because it so beautifully symbolizes the way that Mother Nature uses intricate patterns of folding to structure the fundamental building blocks of life, proteins, which derive their properties as much from the way their molecules are folded as their actual chemical composition.

Bo Steed said...

PC: the law is a noble profession, notwithstanding its practitioners' current focus upon money raking and its professors' current focus upon social engineering.

Most lawyers I know did not have the guts to drop out of law school, and are currently in a prison because of their ridulous lifestyles and hefty mortgages. Good for you dear man.

Peter Palladas said...

I took the pictures. I give myself permission to publish them.

Quite right of course. On the other hand in some countries - France most obviously - you could be hauled up for invasion of privacy if you didn't obtain prior 'model release.'

Slocum said...

Quite right of course. On the other hand in some countries - France most obviously - you could be hauled up for invasion of privacy if you didn't obtain prior 'model release.'

Well, in the U.S. there are a variety of situations where a model release form is required. One is where the photo is used for 'commercial purposes'.

That raises the question of whether or not publishing here constitutes 'commercial purposes'. Ann does run blog ads, attend blogging conferences, give interviews as a prominent blogger, and so on. So it seems like an argument could be made that publication on the blog is a commercial use. I wonder what is Althouse's legal opinion?