April 16, 2007

Another Monday.

Just another manic Monday....

... as the Spring semester crashes in toward a close. Time for cutting pages out of the syllabus and thinking up efficient strategies for presenting the doctrines left for the end. Habeas corpus! Separation of powers! It's harrowing.

But this week is a short teaching week, as I'm off to a conference at Dartmouth -- as noted here. The conference is on Thursday, so that leaves me on my own in Hanover, New Hampshire for the weekend. What to do?

(That linked video is sublime, by the way. Makes you want to do your Susannah Hoffs imitation, doesn't it? It's the easiest imitation in the world, you know.)

9 comments:

Al Maviva said...

If you need to get rid of Habeas Corpus, some guys I know who work at DOJ can tell you how to do that. Cutting out Separation of Powers is pretty easy too - Congress and the Supreme Court do that pretty much every day so you should be able to handle it without difficulty.

And I hope you didn't teach the whole limited 'government of enumerated powers' because that clause was stricken nearly 70 years ago...

XWL said...

With the clarity that a few decades brings, it's clear to me now that my first girlfriend's resemblance to Susannah Hoffs wasn't entirely coincidental.

Theo Boehm said...

If you find yourself at loose ends in Hanover, one thing to do is to visit Augustus Saint-Gaudens' home in Cornish, NH.  It's about 30 minutes from Dartmouth.  It's run by the Park Service, and well worth a side trip.

There is a lovely sculpture garden with duplicates of many of Saint-Gaudens' pieces, including the famous one of Col. Robert Gould Shaw and the Massachusetts 54th Regiment, the subject of the movie "Glory," and a heart-rending piece of music by Charles Ives.  This astonishing sculpture is more available for quiet contemplation than in its original Boston location, and is well worth the trip alone.  I know that the first time I saw it in this setting it brought tears to my eyes.

There are lots of things to see in the Connecticut River Valley, but this is my not-to-be-missed absolute first choice.

TMink said...

Have you heard the recordings she did with Matthew Sweet? Pop and power pop done right! It has an interesting choice of songs, and those two work together in a very, well, harmonious way. Give it a listen!

Trey

PatCA said...

You can always visit Mark Steyn. That would be a fun conversation!

Theo Boehm said...

My mistake! One thing you should be aware of is that, like so many attractions in the frozen north, the Saint-Gaudens house and studio are only open after Memorial Day (May 26). The grounds are open, however, so you should be able to visit the sculpture garden, which, in my opinion, is the main attraction.

Another of my nearby favorites, also unfortunately closed until after May 26th, is the American Precision Museum in Windsor, Vermont.  It's in an 1840's armory building, and houses an amazing collection of gizmos from New England's industrial past.

I could well imagine the Saint-Gaudens house being of interest to Althouse, and I would be fascinated to see what photographs she might take there.  On the other hand, it's pretty obvious our hostess would not be the sort to traipse around a cold stone building to admire the first Bridgeport milling machine.  I am, however, and just had to get a plug in for a place that's on my must-visit list when in the area.

The Connecticut River Valley is full of all sorts of interesting places.  This time of year is not the best, but if you come back in May or October, it's a beautiful region to explore.

Caligula America said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Emmett M. Hogan said...

Try the Long Island ice teas at Five Olde Nugget Alley. I lived on them my senior year.

Roger Sweeny said...

Some of us didn't have to go to work today. Here in Massachusetts, it's Patriot's Day.

Alas, no one seems to know what it means. Something about Thomas Jefferson winning the first Boston Marathon?