May 14, 2008

Today in 1968, blogged.

I continue blogging the past, and today's year — picked by a random number generator — is:
The opening of the Paris peace talks

Bobby Kennedy winning the Indiana primary and yelling at some Nebraska students

Linda LeClair living with her boyfriend and upsetting the Barnard College alumnae

4 comments:

Bruce Hayden said...

Well, for me it meant graduation from high school, three tickets in two weeks during that summer, and starting college.

When I got to college, we still had coats and ties for Sunday dinner. Mandatory chapel service had been dropped only a year or two before. The fraternities still had house mothers and there was no visitation between the sexes in the dorms (or officially the fraternity houses).

Within a year or so, all this had changed. We got inter-visitation that spring. The next year, I was the first male living in the freshman women's dorm. The coats and ties were dropped at the end of my freshman year since a lot of us were wearing them without shirts and with shorts and sandals.

Paddy O. said...

Here's the message I got back from the Times:

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Your satisfaction is very important to us and we thank you for your interest in The New York Times.

Ann Althouse said...

Paddy, it seems they are answering the wrong question, but I'd suggest calling the phone number.

Paddy O. said...

Yeah, either answering the wrong question or doing what I've seen a fair amount of online responses doing. Giving the answer to the question they are willing to answer.

I'll try the number and see what happens.

And thanks for giving a little extra on these recent posts to help us through this Times blackout crisis.