January 6, 2009

Does my lake look Stonehenge-y to you?

"So is there a North American version of Stonehenge just sitting up there beneath the glacial waters of a small northern bay in Lake Michigan?"

17 comments:

Original George said...

Is that a megalith in your pocket, or are you just glad to see me?

Stonehenge was built as a dance arena for prehistoric raves, a university professor believes.

In yesterday's UK Sun.

Meade said...

"Does my lake look Stonehenge-y to you?"

Naw, baby... your lake is gorgeous no matter how fossilized glyph stoned you get.

Original Mike said...

Prehistoric Morris Dancing arena.

chickenlittle said...

Hmmm, I wonder if there's any link to this

siyeh pass said...

Cool and right in my own backyard.

Synova said...

It looks like some boulders fell off the leading edge of a glacier.

It's sort of neat, but not mysterious.

dourwolf said...

What do you mean, your lake? Isn't your lake called Mendota? Michigan is my lake.

chickenlittle said...

I catch your drift Synovia, but I really think there's something to the pyramids. I'm not from around there, but I think siyeh once said she lived near there

Jack said...

I was going to say I saw a ducky and a horsie, but I changed my mind...

SteveR said...

Didn't see Stonehedge but did find Waldo.

Anthony said...

I don't see anything particularly circular about the way the stones are arranged (posted it here). The stones don't even really line up with the superimposed circles in the second photo. I also checked the link to the supposed 'mastodon engraving' and that is similarly . . .errrrm. . . .fanciful?

Very Mars-face-ish.

Edmund said...

We have one here in Texas. It was very strange to come around a hill and see the stones the first time I saw it, while taking my daughter to a week at summer camp. It's made of concrete over chickenwire. It's quite popular as stop for bikers touring the area. See
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stonehenge_II

Edmund said...

Oh, and while there, we cranked the stereo in the car to 11.

Synova said...

No problem, Chickenlittle.

I rather like the idea of the mooring stones found on my ancestral farm and the Kensington runestone.

I mean... proof it's not real is *misspellings?* Egad.

Synova said...

Because, you know... no one spells better than vikings. ;-)

Synova said...

There is, however, a serious logical problem with the idea of ancient archaeological remains located under glacial waters.

If there before the glacier, the glacier would scrape it away.

After the glacier, and our stone age friends are building under water.

Tibore said...

"Anthony said...
I don't see anything particularly circular about the way the stones are arranged (posted it here). The stones don't even really line up with the superimposed circles in the second photo. I also checked the link to the supposed 'mastodon engraving' and that is similarly . . .errrrm. . . .fanciful?

Very Mars-face-ish."


I gotta agree with Anthony here. This all appears to be a stretch disguised as a finding.