January 7, 2009

Finally, it's light enough to open the blinds.

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21 comments:

traditionalguy said...

How many mornings until it's Spring in Wisconsin? Send us a photo when the trees bud out for Spring. The Masters golf tounament comes to Georgia in only 90 days or so.

ricpic said...

Outside counters the screen --
What's real and what's the dream?

siyeh pass said...

We leave the house by 7 and never open the shades before we go. I hate that - and project what the cat must be feeling cooped up, not being able to see outside, all day. I also hate that the house looks like no one's there during the day. Uh, oh, I think I'm getting cabin fever - thanks for open window photo...it helps.

mcg said...

If you pull up the original-sized photo in Flickr you'll find the Twitter text legible.

So read, and discuss. :)

MadisonMan said...

My son is still leaving for the middle school bus when it's dark out. My wife is still using her light box. The forecast highs for late next week are sub-zero.

Spring is many many mornings away.

Ann Althouse said...

"If you pull up the original-sized photo in Flickr you'll find the Twitter text legible. So read, and discuss. :)"

Ah, but can you tell which 2 DVDs are on the table, and can you identify the activity that appears in both movies that related to a recent current event? Huge bonus points if you can.

(I wasn't able to use it because the DVD player in my computer deactivates screen grab. I guess I could have used my camera to grab pictures of the relevant shots.)

Freeman Hunt said...

Well, you've got A Clockwork Orange there, but there's a glare from the plastic on the other one, so I can't tell what it is.

Ann Althouse said...

Okay, the other one is "The Gold Rush." Can you solve the puzzle now?

mydismalswamp said...

My wife tells me we have kinfolks living in Madison.

mydismalswamp said...

A clockwork Orange!? You are a strange one Ann Althouse. Intriguing, eclectic, witty, and smart.

Freeman Hunt said...

Trouble with pants.

There's also boot-tasting, but I don't remember any related current events. Aside from maybe Harry Reid's wishful thinking...

Jason said...

"The Gold Rush" depicts a housing crash.

It's harder with "A Clockwork Orange." Maybe investment bankers jumping out of windows?

blake said...

I was gonna go with eating shoes.

Both take place during hard economic times, presumably. That's relevant, I suppose.

There's an abundance of mascara in both. Mascara's always relevant.

Both involve some hapless guy getting beaten up, don't they...?

Freeman Hunt said...

There was the recent dumping of all those shoes on the road. And there's been throwing of shoes.

So maybe it is the shoes.

"Economic times are hard, Mr. President. People want money to buy bread and are protesting with shoes."
"Let them eat shoes."

rhhardin said...

DVD player in my computer deactivates screen grab.

I was able to grab some screens by disabling hardware display acceleration, under XP Home. So it wasn't so much disabled grabbing as an incapability in the grabbing software.

rhhardin said...

You can follow a Middletown Ohio to Anchorage Alaska flight each day here between about 5am EST and 10am EST, if you want something to do while it's still dark. It's amazing that there's a daily flight between Ohio and Anchorage, but somebody has to send them soybeans, I guess.

Middletown has the most interesting destinations each day. You can ship yourself anywhere.

Ann Althouse said...

Yes, it's the shoes. This notion that shoes are humiliating, in the recent shoe throwing at Bush.

In "Clockwork Orange," the main character demonstrates his submission by licking the sole of a shoe, and in "The Gold Rush," abject starvation is depicted by the cooking and eating of a shoe.

blake said...

Ah, but the Little Tramp eats the shoe with aplomb, not humiliated at all.

Malnourished, perhaps, but never humiliated.

Ann Althouse said...

He makes the best of a bad situation... incredibly poignant and completely funny. Brilliantly complex balancing. Is not Chaplin the greater filmmaker?

dourwolf said...

I'm not sure I would base a broad judgment, as to who was the greater filmmaker, on a single scene -- especially when the Chaplin scene you're using for comparison was the iconic focal point of his film.

blake said...

Perhaps. It's not an unworthy debate.

Bogdonavich's Who The Devil Made It? suggests that the greatest directors are those who trained in the silent era. And of that era, who was the greatest?