October 12, 2009

"No one in our family can ever say anything obvious."

My son Jac said it in 1989 when he was 8, and my ex RLC blogs it now under the title "Obviosophobia."

And it would be obvious — yet wrong! — for you to observe that he misspelled "Obviosophobia."

Now, I'm checking up on R's blog, and I see he's into old quotes — even as he quizzes his 12-year-old son about regret. He remembers: "Someone once called my work 'beautiful but not important.'" Bearing out the truth of Jac's childhood remark, he adds "What a perfect description of this world!"

Are you afraid of not saying things like that?

11 comments:

Scott said...

Obviously.

rhhardin said...

I do devious.

Richard Lawrence Cohen said...

Some people are always bloggable.

Many thanks, Ann!

Fred4Pres said...

Frankly this post is more interesting than middle aged men showing a bit too much thigh.

John Lynch said...

The obvious thing is usually the most important thing.

People tend to talk about tangents because it's more interesting, but it's the big obvious things that matter.

Stating the obvious clears the mind and focuses it on what is important. People, particularly verbal ones, tend to lose sight of the real issues in clouds of words.

Watch how a comment thread evolves, once people leave the obvious behind.

traditionalguy said...

There are hover around in the air floater type thinkers, and there are grounded, categorical based describers of the obvious, thinkers. We can enjoy relations with both types, obviously.

Michael Hasenstab said...

Obviously not.

Methadras said...

I've been sometimes called the John Madden of my family.

traditionalguy said...

Methadras...I knew there was a reason I like you. So what do you think about the St Louis NFL franchise being sold to the Cape Giradeau, MO. boy turned talk radio star?

Methadras said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Methadras said...

Honestly, I think he should stay away from trying to own a football team. Nothing will happen outside of the typical race hustling blowhards within the NFL and outside the NFL, that have contributed dick to the people they allegedly represent, trying to find ways to shake him down for money. Because once he gets out of his comfort zone of radio and moves more into the public arena he will be more subject to the types of harassment he sees of public officials than he sees for himself. Not to mention that rules governing the ownership of an NFL team could be a problem for him. It's a government sanctioned monopoly and there may be other legal travails he isn't willing to step in. I just hope his lawyers vet everything properly.

I think this is a case where he sees himself fulfilling a personal dream of his and this is a case where he is probably flush with cash, money is cheap, and the Rams are probably being sold at a discount and this is an opportunity for him to get in on the action as a co-owner.

He should stick to what he does best, radio. He is untouchable in that venue and I just see pitfalls for a venture like this for him.