January 1, 2011

Meade sees a new bird.

"You really don't know what it is?"

"No."

"Is it big?"

"I've seen bigger."

"You've seen an ostrich."

P1050688

48 comments:

Jason (the commenter) said...

He's seeing new birds? I didn't know you had that sort of a marriage.

edutcher said...

What's that in the background? Looks like a prison wall.

Ann Althouse said...

"What's that in the background? Looks like a prison wall."

The lens is telephotoing a lot there, bringing in the wall of a house that's actually pretty far back. I cropped the photo to make it look weird/interesting.

kimsch said...

Looks like a mourning dove with her feathers all puffed up for warmth.

wv: preiniu

Ann Althouse said...

@kimsch Meade says "That's what it looked like to me too, except it was bigger than that."

Mumpsimus said...

Another vote for Mourning Dove.

They can fluff up pretty big when it's cold.

Trooper York said...

"I've seen bigger."

Seriously!

Ignorance is Bliss said...

What kind of tree is it in? If it's a pear tree then I'd have to go with a partridge.

chickelit said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Big Mike said...

I agree that it's a mourning dove, fluffed up against the cold.

chickelit said...

The lens is telephotoing a lot there, bringing in the wall of a house that's actually pretty far back.

Is that the one Joe Mcginniss is renting?

edutcher said...

Dove was my first guess, although downtown or inner city pigeon might be right.

deborah said...

Maybe a juvenile hawk?

Penny said...

Or a blue grouse.

ricpic said...

Brooklyn/Madison

The thing that really tugs the heart in life
Is not the view high wide and long,
Rather a humble brick backyard
A scrum of trees and one plump bird of song.

Peano said...

Good grief. That's just a plain old dove.

Quaestor said...

The distinction between a dove and a pigeon is somewhat artificial. The urban rat-bird is really a European Rock Dove.

deborah said...

:(

rhhardin said...

The ostrich leaveth her eggs in the earth, and warmeth them in dust,
And forgetteth that the foot may crush them, or that the wild beast may break them.
She is hardened against her young ones, as though they were not hers: her labour is in vain without fear.

Paco Wové said...

Mourning dove, no question.

Quayle said...

The beak is the giveaway that it is a dove.

Synova said...

Could it be an escaped dove of some sort?

Michael said...

Mourning Dove. Trust me on this, I have shot thousands of them. They are delicious, by the way. Breast them, wrap in bacon, little olive oil and over the grill.

Clyde said...

Whatever it is, I'll bet it tastes like chicken.

pavlova8 said...

looks like a pidgeon to me..

J.R. said...

Perhaps the Eurasian ring neck dove has made its way to Wisconsin. It is clearly of the dove family and has the coloring of one of these.

Trooper York said...

I think it is a Lonsome Dove.

Trooper York said...

But then most pigeons look like Robert Duvall.

Meade said...

I agree that the photo looks like a dove but if it was a dove, it was twice the size of any dove I've ever seen. I think it was a hawk.

chickelit said...

I think it's a lost baby pelican.

Titus said...

Did you guys know that lesbian birds have short hair on top and long hair in back?

Roman said...

If you could get a bit closer, it could look like dinner.

dont tread 2012 said...

Meade, its not a hawk, hawks don't have that type of beak nor do they sit that way. Hawks generally stand up tall. Looks like a mourning dove. Tough to ID due to the branch in front and it looks like the thing may have moved its head when you shot it.

sonicfrog said...

Not a mourning dove... Those are gay in color. More likely a ring-neck dove.

Peano said...

Meade said...I agree that the photo looks like a dove but if it was a dove, it was twice the size of any dove I've ever seen.

Which proves that Meade isn't the measure of all things. It's a dove.

Bart Hall (Kansas, USA) said...

I would say Turtle Dove, though way far north for this time of year. Generally a Eurasian bird, this one is probably an escape, and unlikely to survive the winter. Look for a somewhat blacker band at the back of the neck if you see it again.

Meade said...

Okay, okay, it was a Dove -- a rare two foot long Red-tailed Hawk Dove.

The Elder said...

" . . . it was a Dove -- a rare two foot long Red-tailed Hawk Dove."

Hmmm. And in Madison, that should put it on the Endangered Species list by Tuesday.

Actually, it looks more like a rare two foot long Red-tailed Horned Frog to me. They can fly, you know.

Cedarford said...

Meade said...
Okay, okay, it was a Dove -- a rare two foot long Red-tailed Hawk Dove
=================
Jeez, Meade! You're an outdoorsy type who has dragged Althouse out on more nature than she encountered before she met you and you're an expert on plants and fungus and knowing when to tell Anne not to eat stuff like wild swamp hemlock...
But your bird expertise is not on that level!
Ask for a Audubon Field Book, "Birds of N America" for next Christmas! The Audubon mushroom book is also outstanding!
Red-tailed hawk, my ass!

lemondog said...

Red-tailed hawk, my ass!

Hahaha

Obvious mourning dove.........

Michael said...

JR is correct. It has to be a Eurasian ring neck dove. They have been invading North America in recent years.

Anyone who knows anything about mourning doves knows they are not found in Wisconsin in the winter. The only doves found in cold climates in the winter in NA are the rock dove (common pigeon) and the Eurasian ring neck dove. The Eurasian ring neck dove is also a least one and one-half times(perhaps 2X) the size of a morning dove.

Michael said...

Upon review of the internet, it's more properly call the Eurasian Collared Dove. There's lots of info out there in cyber-space about its invasion of North America.

Lonetown said...

Its a female pheasant.

damn city folk

Ann Althouse said...

"Obvious mourning dove........."

It's not that color.

Plus, you're looking at a photograph and are lacking the sense of scale. Meade got very excited when he saw the thing fly by and land in the tree. There are mourning doves all the time and they don't provoke any reaction at all. I was here when he reacted to it. I'm sure it was quite large. You're seeing the photo where it came to rest in a tree. Yes, it's puffed up. But the original reaction was to a bird in flight. We don't have a photograph of that.

Drew said...

Anyone who knows anything about mourning doves knows they are not found in Wisconsin in the winter.

You hear that you Mourning Doves hanging around my back yard in Eau Claire!! You're not actually here!

Mr. Forward said...

It's a Morning After Dove.

Lonetown said...

see here for a common pheasant hen pic:

http://www.shutterstock.com/pic-3326326/stock-photo-ring-necked-pheasant-hen.html

Meade said...

It was a
Sharp-shinned Hawk.

I just saw another one and got a better look.