May 30, 2011

Did you know "how important the personal innovation lifestyle is becoming"?

What's your personal innovation lifestyle? Is it focused on "ordinariness and ... the capacity... to take on roles that involve higher levels of personal responsibility"? Are you "deploy[ing] new values (like sharing)"? Do you "want aut0nomy" — whatever that is?

25 comments:

rhhardin said...

These are people without dogs.

Henry said...

These are people without kids.

LYNNDH said...

I'm retired. Don't need personal innovation lifestyle. I'm me, myself, I. And confortable with it.

Henry said...

My son innovated a mudball fight yesterday. I innovated yelling a lot.

vnjagvet said...

First Davis, now Zuckerberg. They sound to me that they are both cut from the same self-absorbed, pretentious cloth.

Freeman Hunt said...

So if you set out to learn anything new, you're engaging in a "personal innovation lifestyle?"

I don't think it's fair that the masses of people who do this should have their activities slapped with such a dorky label.

Additionally, that article is a good example of corporate-speak. Bleh.

ET1492 said...

Hobbies.

ic said...

Are you "deploy[ing] new values (like sharing)"? Do you "want aut0nomy"— whatever that is?

sharing: like sharing your incomes, like sharing your incomes with the govt., like sharing your incomes with those more deserving your money...

autonomy: like what the TeaPartiers were screaming all last summer, like not sharing, like doing whatever you please with your own money, like being selfish,...

ricpic said...

The best laid plans of mice and men gang aft agley.

--Robert Burns

edutcher said...

He's trying to invent something cool before Facebook becomes old hat.

"Google was one of the first companies to recognise the cerebral and creative nature of workers with its 20% time allocation for creative tasks"

Baloney.

W L Gore - the people who gave you Gore-Tex - has been doing the same thing for better than 50 years.

Phil 3:14 said...

that article is a good example of corporate-speak.

I wonder what his consultant fee is?

PatCA said...

From this day forward, I will never again read that man's blog, as a new experience, something I can fold into my personal innovation lifestyle.

Acknowledging his blog interferes with my seaweed collection time, and I find him insufferably pompous as well.

traditionalguy said...

Listening to the precious and cute takes on life everywhere on NPR only makes me crave some plain talk about serious questions and true answers. Cute is seldom worth the waste of anyone's time.

MamaM said...

It is not straightforward to translate people’s desire for innovation to the enterprise setting..

People's desires for innovation are seldom straightforward, which makes translation to any setting difficult.

Megaera said...

These nitwits aren't "sharing" -- they've just acquired a few fancy time-wasting hobbies and want to prance about them in public. If they'd joined a volunteer rescue organization, if they were working in hospice, serving in soup kitchens, doing post-natural-disaster cleanup in hellhole messes like Katrina or Joplin or, or fighting wildfires, I'd call THAT sharing. This is the precise opposite. Wankers and posers all.

John Lynch said...

Paging Scott Adams.

I love how corporate-speak constantly uses buzzwords without ever defining them.

And yes, it's people without kids.

bagoh20 said...

Facebook is an absolutely horrible application (product) of very low quality, yet extremely successful. this happens all the time, for example: cheetos or MS Windows. Such success is primarily luck.

And calling something old a new name is not innovation nor creative. Get over yourselves, "leaders".

bagoh20 said...

If an idiot wins the lottery, people will start asking for his advice.

jamboree said...

I love these MBA words for what poor people kinda naturally do. ("Sharing" as part of a "personal innovation lifestyle" - Shut. Up.)

It takes a company retreat to brainstorm ways to be this big of an asshole.

Seeing Red said...

Sharing is a "new value?"

Freeman Hunt said...

Corporate speak sounds like a sociopath or an android trying to describe normal human existence to space aliens.

Traveler said...

Phil, Freeman - surprising you think it's corporate speak. By the way I don't have a consultant's fee. Yesterday Air BnB was valued at $1 billion - a platform for people to rent out their rooms; at the same time Couch Surfing doesn't seem to have a stock market value that I am aware of - it allows people to share their rooms at no charge. My point is that some groups of people are seeking out ways to share without making money, while others are making it in the billions and I like to write about the former group, I do it on Forbes because I'm lucky to have that opportunity. 'deploying new values' - bad piece of phrasing. I meant deploying them through online platforms in a way that provides some people with a non-commercial way of 'doing business'.
Personal innovation lifestyle - finding ways to live more constructively without commercial gain - it's not charity work, it's trying to find a way to turn back the corporate agenda.
PatCA - we both collect seaweed. is that being pompous? I don't get that one.
Edutcher - W.L Gore - sorry I should have said that, and I think there are probably other examples.
IC autonomy - is also not being told what to do by people who have a greedy agenda.
John - I have five kids. Am not really sure how having or not having them counts in this argument.

haydn said...

Not sure why it labeled me traveler above - my name is Haydn. Ann - "take on roles that involve higher levels of personal responsibility" - too many people don't get autonomy in the workplace; they should be given more personal responsibility - is that wrong minded?

Freeman Hunt said...

Haydn, it was a short blog post, so having just two or three bits that sound like corporate speak made it seem as though the entire piece was written that way. You're right that it wasn't. Sorry for being, perhaps, a bit too harsh and glib.

You make a good point that people are capable of greater personal responsibility. I will say though that it seems there might also be an underlying aversion to simple hard work. It is more fun, for example, to volunteer in an executive capacity than it is to volunteer for the tedium that carries those decisions out. Some people are probably very valuable when included in executive functions, others less so. Just as some people could use special time at work to produce valuable innovation while others would probably use it on what are better characterized as hobbies and result in no real gains in innovation or productivity.

I'm right with you on smartphones, by the way. I dumped mine last month.

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