November 28, 2011

Law schools use search engines and Facebook to check out applicants.

According to a Kaplan Test Prep survey, 41% of law school admissions officers admit it.
Mathiew Le, director of admissions at the University of Washington School of Law, thinks the validity and reliability of information found on the Internet is questionable.
You think? But the information on law school applications might be a little questionable too (once you get past official transcripts and test scores).

8 comments:

Heart_Collector said...

So what happens when they see you talking about the dishwasher you blew at tgi fridays after smoking a joint with your friend santos and drinking 9 margaritas?

Heart_Collector said...

Im assuming they fast track you the job?

MadisonMan said...

I'm reminded of the person looking for an ad who manipulated google so that a search for him by the ad agency showed benficial things.

An enterprising lawyer-to-be has already, I'm certain, created a facebook persona that the law schools can find easily. A persona that is in marked contrast to their true nature.

Students are always -- ALWAYS -- two steps ahead of bureacrats at Law Schools.

edutcher said...

Does this mean they're actually concerned what kind of people become the next generation of Congressmen?

Unemployment said...

What are you basing this speculation on, professor?
And, even if whatever you're saying is true, how does it compare to the blatant misinformation spewed out by law schools regarding post graduation employment?

Chuck66 said...

Works for me. When I was recently looking for new employment, I was hoping they would do some research on my to see what all I have done that doesn't show up on a resume (like tons of volunteer work...as in a leadership role).

Irene said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Irene said...

It's an issue with jury selection, too.