December 6, 2011

At the Side-View Café...

A Madison truck

... don't look back.

38 comments:

Chip Ahoy said...

I don't even like 100 watt light bulbs, but I found it important to buy a lifetime supply and then some if only to be subversive.

ndspinelli said...

We call those horseshit Bosnian peasant shack lightbulbs algore bulbs.

Curious George said...

Chicago Cub great Ron Santo was finally elected into Baseball's Hall of Fame, sadly almost one year from his passing.

I think somewhere Ronnie did this one last time!

Santo suffered from diabetes through his whole playing career and life...losing both legs to the disease. He was the face of the JDRF in Chicago helping raise millions toward a cure.

Congratulations Ronnie!

Matt said...

Man, I got my popcorn ready and came to read the response to this only to find out that Prof. Althouse hasn't posted one yet.

Conserve Liberty said...

Having done m part to increase the 2011 earnings of tungsten miners and piss off David Chu (we're taking away a choice that is bad for consumers to make for themselves) , I won't be surprised to learn algore is taking kickbacks from Sylvania and GE (owns fluorescent patents) at the same time

edutcher said...

Looks like somebody blindsided a paint truck.

Matt said...

Man, I got my popcorn ready and came to read the response to this only to find out that Prof. Althouse hasn't posted one yet.

I think she only responds to blogs somebody reads.

Peter Hoh said...

So, anyone know anything about Bentley University?

Chip S. said...

It's the Rolls-Royce of Rt. 128 universities.

Peter Hoh said...

I have to drive someone to an event at UW Stout and hang out for an hour or two.

Any suggestions for a good place to grab a bite to eat and put my feet up?

Is there anybody who lives nearby who's interested in meeting for coffee/pie/hot cocoa? My treat (within reason).

Peter Hoh said...

I should mention that it's an evening event.

Petunia said...

With you on the 100W incandescent bulbs, Chip Ahoy. I have more than a lifetime's supply but I might need to buy a few more.

bagoh20 said...

"I think she only responds to blogs somebody reads."

I wasted my time on it, including posting a little push back. It is kinda sophomoric, whatever that means.

wdnelson93 said...

Today, if my brother and I have our way, was the very last time our 81 y.o. Dad sat behind the wheel of a car. He drove himself to a store he has frequented for the last 4 years - a mile from home, and, to use his words "never felt so completely lost in my life". Was it the memory loss or the blood sugar of 45? He was there for two and a half hours; probably had been there for quite some time before his sugar headed into the danger zone, so who can say?

I wish the DMV would publish a manual for how to help your aging parents transition from being a driver to a non-driver.

I am so grateful everything turned out okay.

Alex said...

Classy: Unions And Leftists Trying To Recall WI Gov. Scott Walker Going After His Family, Neighbors, Children’s Friends…

Garage - defend this.

Carnifex said...

@ Conserve Liberty

Are you implying that man/bear/pig would have other than genuine philanthropic motives? I'm shocked, shocked I say, at such aspersions.

Such ideas can easily be disproved by sheer deduction. One of his three mansions has 28 rooms in it, so that's at least 28 lights. Just cause I'm lazy we'll say all three have 28 each.

A six pack of 100 watt incandescent GE lightbulbs cost $7.97 at Home Depot. A 2 pack of Ecosmart 23 watt (same as 100 watt incandescent) costs #7.97 also at home Depot.

Apply a little math, ($7.97/6)x 28 x 3= $111.58 for incandescent bulbs. That's just to replace the existing old bulbs, not up-keep.

The cost of the new CFL bulbs, ($7.97/2) x 28 x 3 = $334.74

You can see clearly that it's much cheaper for man/bear/pig to keep using incandescent light bulbs. No one would ever volunteer to give away their money for an equal amount of light.

That doesn't even account for the cost of disposal of CFL bulbs. Or if you broke one.

You would have to be rich as Warren Buffet to want to give your money away like that!

Carnifex said...

@WDNELSON

The past year I've been spending more time with my dad than usual because of his cancer. More time with Mom too. They both are getting to the point you're talking about. To be fair, as a truck driver MOST motorist scare the bejeezus outta me. Dad bought a new used car, and after 2 weeks had already backed into 2 poles. Just small fender benders in a parking lot but more than I remember him having over the rest of my life.

john said...

Chip Ahoy - starting in a few months you could make a nice little income selling them on ebay.

Carnifex said...

And finally the reason I dropped by was to congratulate the Wisconsin Tea Partiers doing the job the GAB, and the GOP won't do.

With the corruption of state government by union workers (and yes I mean corruption) I am not surprised that the GAB assumes Donald Duck, and Mickey Mouse are real people, and live in Madison.

What for the life of me I can't figure out is why the GOP isn't vetting the petitions. Geez guys, you want a little Vaseline for the butt fucking you were just gonna sit there and take?

Hey! GOP! I got some fine porcupine eggs here for sale.
They're 25 cents each, or 2 for a dollar. How many pairs can I put you down for? (for city people, porcupines don't lay eggs. What I'm selling are cockleburrs)

Ya' wonder why the base hates the RINO's so much, here is an example.

Don't Tread 2012 said...

Sponge-worthy.

My 100W bulbs just arrived from Amazon. (2) 24-packs. Why did I bother? Because I can, and benign subversion is good.

I read the blog post that Matt linked to...a 'vapid moron'?? I disagree. Is that how this guy thinks he can leapfrog other blogs, by slamming the competition???

Somebody skipped out on business and salesmanship 101...pass the popcorn.

Carnifex said...

For those interested in the harvesting of porcupine eggs there is a little start up cost, and overhead but the actual reaping is easy.

To harvest cockleburrs:
1) Buy a long haired dog
2) let dog outside to go potty
3) spend day and a half removing cockleburrs from dogs ears, neck, whiskers, belly, legs, anus...
4) repeat depending on dogs bladder size

Don't Tread 2012 said...

"I wish the DMV would publish a manual for how to help your aging parents transition from being a driver to a non-driver."

Do yourself a favor and reject the notion that the DMV is capable of providing such advice.

Having faced this, I can relate to your situation. It comes down to safety for 1. your loved one and 2. for the rest of the motoring public.

Its hard, I know, but removing the emotion from the situation is necessary in order to make the correct decision. A car is a deadly weapon in the hands of the wrong person.

Psychedelic George said...

Today is December 7.

Remember.

"Always will we remember the character of the onslaught against us.

No matter how long it may take us to overcome this premeditated invasion, the American people, in their righteous might, will win through to absolute victory."

If you follow this link to various US government resolutions from December 1941, you'll also find a radio address by FDR from Dec. 9 and 10. (It must have been recorded and broadcast on different days in different parts of the country.) It is a chilling speech. Here are part of his remarks:

"I was about to add that ahead there lies sacrifice for all of us.

But it is not correct to use that word. The United States does not consider it a sacrifice to do all one can, to give one's best to our Nation when the Nation is fighting for its existence and its future life.

It is not a sacrifice for any man, old or young, to be in the Army or the Navy of the United States. Rather is it a privilege.

It is not a sacrifice for the industrialist or the wage earner, the farmer or the shopkeeper, the trainman or the doctor, to pay more taxes, to buy more bonds, to forego extra profits, to work longer or harder at the task for which he is best fitted. Rather is it a privilege.

It is not a sacrifice to do without many things to which we are accustomed if the national defense calls for doing without.

A review this morning leads me to the conclusion that at present we shall not have to curtail the normal articles of food. There is enough food for all of us and enough left over to send to those who are fighting on the same side with us.

There will be a clear and definite shortage of metals of many kinds for civilian use, for the very good reason that in our increased program we shall need for war purposes more than half of that portion of the principal metals which during the past year have gone into articles or civilian use. We shall have to give up many things entirely.

I am sure that the people in every part of the Nation are prepared in their individual living to win this war. I am sure they will cheerfully help to pay a large part of its financial cost while it goes on. I am sure they will cheerfully give up those material things they are asked to give up.

I am sure that they will retain all those great spiritual things without which we cannot win through."

There's an op-ed piece in the WSJ this morning, quoting Gingrich warning of the danger of EMP attack.

Pogo said...

This day still lives in infamy for some, but Sasha and Malia’s school is serving a Japanese lunch menu today.

Sic transit sacrificium.

Psychedelic George said...

Did you know that Patton was stationed at Pearl Harbor in the 1930s?

"In a 1937 report, he concluded Japan was willing and possibly able to attack Hawaii. His report detailed the following:

1. This study is based on the inescapable assumption that complete surprise offers the greatest opportunity for the successful capture of these islands.

2. Some of the Mandate Islands [noted above as the Carolines, Gilberts and Marianas], about which absolutely nothing is known, are only 2,500 miles distant, seven days’ steaming over the loneliest sea lanes in the world. Who can say that an expeditionary force is not in these islands now’

3. Since becoming modernized, Japan has never declared war.”

Bob Ellison said...

Prediction: the Kindle Fire and its kin (B&N Nook, etc.) will out-sell the iPad this holiday season.

Kit said...

Its hard, I know, but removing the emotion from the situation is necessary in order to make the correct decision. A car is a deadly weapon in the hands of the wrong person.

Going through the same thing, here, only we're not in the same town. We've tried to reason with him, but he tunes us out. If I'm there, I drive. It's all I can do as I half expect 'that' call. I just hope he doesn't hurt anyone else.

Freeman Hunt said...

Man, I got my popcorn ready and came to read the response to this only to find out that Prof. Althouse hasn't posted one yet.

I think that post was probably too stupid for a response.

Shanna said...

It's hard for older people to give up their independence and that is what a car represents to many. It took a serious wreck for my grandfather to give his up (and even then, he not infrequently drove the riding lawnmower to Kroger).

Freeman Hunt said...

It took a serious wreck for my grandfather to give his up (and even then, he not infrequently drove the riding lawnmower to Kroger).

That's not a bad idea! I need to put that in a "When I'm Very Old" file.

MadisonMan said...

I wish the DMV would publish a manual for how to help your aging parents transition from being a driver to a non-driver.

Yes. My Dad is alone now, and I wonder for his future. He is an extraordinarily careful driver, as he knows that at his age, one accident and you lose your license. He doesn't drive at night, and he configures things so he doesn't have to make many left turns across traffice. There are things that help in my hometown -- free bus service, reduced cab fares (with 24-h notice). But him losing a car would mean quite an adjustment for a person who likes a routine.

Paco Wové said...

"I think she only responds to blogs somebody reads."

But kudos to Matt for trying to drive a little traffic to a friend's blog.

Don't Tread 2012 said...

Stunning!

Calypso Facto said...

Peter Hoh said:Any suggestions for a good place to grab a bite to eat and put my feet up?

I'd recommend Acoustic Cafe, Peter. It's right by campus, and has great soups and sandwiches, big booth benches and a laid back atmosphere for hanging out. When are you going to be in Menomonie?

Patrick said...

wdnelson: Good luck. That's tough, and something my siblings and I will face in a few years. My church has an annual seminar for this particular issue. Haven't attended, but probably will.

Shanna said...

That's not a bad idea! I need to put that in a "When I'm Very Old" file.

We thought it was kind of hilarious (aside from being worried he would get hit crossing the road). He also had a trailer that hooked on the end.

sonicfrog said...

And if you stare at it long enough, a dinosaur pops right out, just like one of those holographic posters!!!!

Uh Oh... Chip Ahoy bait!!!!

Dust Bunny Queen said...

Losing your driving privileges or ability to drive is a very serious problem in the rural area where I live.

It is quite a distance (many miles often) between places you need to go: doctor's office, pharmacy, grocery store, post office, church etc.

There are no public transportation services or cabs available, so the elderly or disabled who find themselves in this situation have the choices of
1. Relying on family,friends and church members to ferry them around.
2. Hire a caretaker type of person to run errands and give occasional rides
3. Move in with family or have family move in with you.
4. Sell their long time home and move to a strange city or to an assisted living facility.

Scary because the elderly have lost their independence. Demeaning to have to beg for assistance and rides from others. Sad to have to sell your home. Expensive to move out. Frightening to move to a new unknown place and sad to leave your friends.

One day, we will all be in this position. Have mercy on those who are there now. Help out those who you can.

wdnelson93 said...

Thanks DBQ. You're right - it's not one transition, it's many huge life-altering ones generally in quick succession. These days I am just continually filled with gratitude for my brother - who is stepping in to separate Dad from his car (Dad sees me as being on Mom's 'side' so I'm staying as much out of that picture as possible) - and for my Mom's many friends who are waiting in the wings to fill the gaps when needed.

Thanks everyone for all your comments. The "keep emotion out of it" one was esp. a good reminder.

Deanna