December 3, 2011

Mic check... old style... with Vicki McKenna...

...and New Media Meade:

17 comments:

chuck b. said...

A mic check? Did someone get miced?

Ann Althouse said...

@chuck b. Thanks for noticing that I've given up.

James said...

Vicki McKenna

Meade said...

She's terrific!

James said...

The people I know who've met Vicki all speak very highly of her.

EDH said...

Doing a mic check, aren't you're supposed to say "sibilance"

... or is it "syphilis"?

A sibilant is a manner of articulation of fricative and affricate consonants, made by directing a stream of air with the tongue towards the sharp edge of the teeth, which are held close together. Examples of sibilants are the consonants at the beginning of the English words sip, zip, ship, chip, and Jeep, and the second consonant in vision. The symbols in the International Phonetic Alphabet used to denote the sibilant sounds in these words are, respectively, [s] [z] [ʃ] [tʃ] [dʒ] [ʒ]. (The sounds [tʃ] [dʒ], as in chip and Jeep, are affricates; the rest are fricatives.) Sibilants have a characteristically intense sound, which accounts for their non-linguistic use in getting one's attention (e.g. calling someone using "sssst!" or quieting someone using "shhhh!").

In the alveolar hissing sibilants [s] and [z], the back of the tongue forms a narrow channel (is grooved) to focus the stream of air more intensely, resulting in a high pitch. With the hushing sibilants (occasionally termed shibilants), such as English [ʃ], [tʃ], [ʒ], and [dʒ], the tongue is flatter, and the resulting pitch lower.[citation needed][we need cite that they are not grooved]

Sibilants may also be called stridents, a term which refers to the perceptual intensity of the sound of a sibilant consonant, or obstacle fricatives/affricates, which refers to the critical role of the teeth in producing the sound as an obstacle to the airstream. Non-sibilant fricatives and affricates produce their characteristic sound directly with the tongue or lips etc. and the place of contact in the mouth, without secondary involvement of the teeth.

The characteristic intensity of sibilants means that small variations in tongue shape and position are perceivable, with the result that there are a large number of sibilant types that contrast in various languages.

LarryK said...

Nice job New Media! I was especially intrigued that he said meeting Blaska and Vicki was like meeting two of the Beatles. Wonder if he remembers this little exchange between me, him and Blaska about starting a new Fab Four (scroll to the bottom)...

http://www.thedailypage.com/daily/article.php?article=33929

So if New Media is the new John and Dave B the second coming of Ringo, that must make me Paul 2.0 and Vicki the new George (or, maybe, Georgia).

Meade said...

LarryK, thanks for reminding me of that fun exchange.

And yes, clearly, Larry, you would have to be Paul, the "cute" Beatle.

I don't know - Vicki is sort of all Fab Four in one: smart, funny, cute, and... well, no, no way is she quiet!

LarryK said...

Thanks NMMeade, the last time someone called me cute was in the eighth grade. I'd rather have Paul 2.0's title, the "Billionaire Beatle."

Jess said...

LarryK wrote:
Thanks NMMeade, the last time someone called me cute was in the eighth grade. I'd rather have Paul 2.0's title, the "Billionaire Beatle."


Heh. If you're a Billionaire Beatle, I think you'll find that you're cute enough for all practical purposes.

David Blaska said...

If I am a Beatle it is probably Stuart Sutcliffe. New Media is a radio natural. I should have held the camera on him.

Ann Althouse said...

"New Media is a radio natural."

Is that like saying he's not cute? But he is super-cute!

Meade said...

Uh, heh. To you and my dear old mother, maybe.

But hey, that's good enough for me!

walter said...

Gotta keep yer fingers from covering the camera mic ;)

Heart_Collector said...

Is that Geddy Lee?

bagoh20 said...

Vicki is super cute too.

Maybe New Media Meade could produce a video on how to hook and land a Madison girl. I've read that they are elusive and dangerous especially after you get them in the boat.

ndspinelli said...
This comment has been removed by the author.