July 21, 2012

"A Crimson-faced Harvard Alumni Assn. says it regrets allowing [Ted] Kaczynski to use its so-called Red Book to update his profile."

"There, Kaczynski lists his occupation as 'prisoner' and includes the following as among his awards: 'Eight life sentences, issued by the United States District Court for the Eastern District of California, 1998.' He blithely gave his address as the federal prison in Florence, Colo."

ADDED: I don't see what's blithe or even inappropriate about this. It's grimly factual. Harvard should not censor the flow of information about its alumni. Take responsibility for it all. 

42 comments:

Shining Wit said...

Crimson faced - that's a good one.

wyo sis said...

So, do we never publicly notice mass murder by lunatics or never forget them? This man clearly does not want to be forgotten.

JAL said...

Like the family who discovers they have a horse thief or assassin in the family tree?

Lem said...

I agree with Althouse.

edutcher said...

Sounds like some of the old Stalinists at Haavahd Yaad are getting wistful for the old days when people who made you look bad simply ceased to exist, even in memory

sydney said...

Now that guy was evil. Not chaos. And yes, they should leave it in. He belongs to them.

Fen said...

Following Libtard logic, Harvard radicalized him and should be shut down.

Michael K said...

There's a nice example of paranoid schizophrenia and math skills.

I do wonder sometimes at Ted. It can be hard to tell. One student, after interviewing a patient, asked why there was a sign above his bed "Do not give him any batteries." The answer was that he ate them.

Jon K said...

Kaczynski was always misnamed as the “Unabomber”, so tagged based on the academic locations of his earliest targets. A more appropriate name would reflect his intent and core philosophy: the “EnviroBomber”.

Lyle said...

This harks to either Havard's or Yale's failure to remember its graduates that fought for the Confederacy as if the children of slave owners never studied there.

somefeller said...

It isn't censorship if Harvard decides to edit or turn down submissions for publication in their alumni list. It's called editorial discretion, which is what anyone in the publishing business does every day. Also, Harvard isn't a governmental entity preventing news about his alumni status from becoming known, so using the term censorship here is a stretch.

edutcher mumbles about a school that he knows little about, other than the fact that it wouldn't admit him: Sounds like some of the old Stalinists at Haavahd Yaad are getting wistful for the old days when people who made you look bad simply ceased to exist, even in memory.

A quote from the article: The alumni association's apology does little for one of those injured by Kaczynski: Yale computer science professor David Gelernter, who lost his right hand and right eye to one of Kaczynski's homemade bombs, and refuses to allow himself to be called a victim. "It's very chilling," Gelernter told the Herald. "He's an unrepentant terrorist murderer who cut people, and slashed people to death in their kitchens, leaving them to bleed, while he hid in a shack somewhere in the West. So for some institution to lend authority to him, well, I can't believe such things happen in the United States." Gelernter added: "The new criminals here are the publishers of this 'Red Book,' for their passive collusion with this murderer."

David Gelernter is also a conservative writer who has a new book out. I guess he's a big bad leftie Stalinist too, right, edutcher?

somefeller said...

This harks to either Havard's or Yale's failure to remember its graduates that fought for the Confederacy as if the children of slave owners never studied there.

If you're talking about Harvard's decision to not list Confederate soldiers who died in the Civil War at Harvard Memorial Church, there is some inconsistency there given some other names on the wall and people on campus have noticed that. Personally, I can see both sides of the issue for that particular item. But it shouldn't be a surprise to see that universities in the North don't want to add the names of those who fought for the Confederacy to their public monuments. And there's no shortage of such monuments south of the Mason-Dixon line.

chickelit said...

I'm sure that Harvard can stand minor dings and blows to its reputation.

Titus is a Harvard alumnus is he not?

They asked for diversity, didn't they?

Ann Althouse said...

"Also, Harvard isn't a governmental entity preventing news about his alumni status from becoming known, so using the term censorship here is a stretch."

That's a topic I've discussed many times on this blog. I didn't say it was illegal censorship or a violation of the right of free speech, so it doesn't matter that it's not the government.

Harvard has (I think) a Facebook-like website where alumni can enter their own information.

What if Facebook excluded certain types of people from putting up profiles? It's like that.

Now, they can legally make judgments like that. The question is whether it's better for them to be more restrictive or better to be more free.

I'm making the argument to them about what they should do, and I'm in favor of more free speech and less censorship (even when a private entity is exercising its own right to control its site).

ndspinelli said...

I'm sure Yale grads enjoy this. Kaczynski should have included his Federal BOP# 04475-046.

traditionalguy said...

I bet Harvard is secretly proud of its world famous leader in super intelligent mail bombing techniques of domestic terrorism.

Americans love a winner and the #1 guy at anything. Speakin of which super smart Holmes set himself some world records...well American records. Those Chechen Moslems outdid him in the Beslan middle school gymn and later in the Moscow auditorium. We are not #1, yet.

David said...

somefeller said...

If you're talking abot Harvard's decision to not list Confederate soldiers who died in the Civil War at Harvard Memorial Church, there is some inconsistency there given some other names on the wall and people on campus have noticed that.


It would have been embarrassing to list the Confederates, as they significantly outnumbered the Unionists. The number of Harvard graduates who fought for the Confederacy outnumbers the number who fought for the Union, even though overall Yankee graduates were much more numerous. This dirty little secret is obscured by the fact that some Harvard grads fought for the Union with extraordinary courage. They are rightly memorialized, but the memorials also serve the purpose of hiding the lack of overall military vigor by many of Harvard's privileged and influential graduates.

Astro said...

On a related matter:
It is surprisingly true that many universities allow former students and staff to continue to use their school email addresses long after they have departed the university.

It seems to me this could be a source of fraud, allowing persons to represent themselves as members of a university when they are not.

somefeller said...

Althouse says:That's a topic I've discussed many times on this blog. I didn't say it was illegal censorship or a violation of the right of free speech, so it doesn't matter that it's not the government.

I know you've discussed the topic. I'm just not convinced by the arguments extending the definition of censorship to include acts by private actors, particularly in a publishing/editorship context. From what I've seen, extending the definition muddies free speech concepts more than it clarifies them. For example, the decision by a private actor to not publish something may itself be an act of speech on its part.

somefeller said...

David says: It would have been embarrassing to list the Confederates, as they significantly outnumbered the Unionists. The number of Harvard graduates who fought for the Confederacy outnumbers the number who fought for the Union, even though overall Yankee graduates were much more numerous. This dirty little secret is obscured by the fact that some Harvard grads fought for the Union with extraordinary courage. They are rightly memorialized, but the memorials also serve the purpose of hiding the lack of overall military vigor by many of Harvard's privileged and influential graduates.

Are you sure about that? I haven't looked into the issue until today, but from what I've gathered online it looks like the Harvard Union enlisted and dead outnumbered the Confederate enlisted and dead. This article provides some numbers on war dead and enlistments, and states that the Union outnumbered the Confederacy on both. It also points out that In 1863, there were fewer than 2,700 living graduates of Harvard College. More than half of them enlisted.

Libertarian Advocate said...

Astro: It seems to me this could be a source of fraud, allowing persons to represent themselves as members of a university when they are not.

I have a .me address, but I'm not an Apple employee...

Both my Grad and Undergrad schools gave me the option to sign up for a FILLBLANK.edu address. I think I took 'em up on the offer years ago but never actually used the addresses (mostly because I already get too much damn email).

The Godfather said...

The latest Harvard Alumni Directory [hardcopy] that I have is for 2010 and lists "Kaczynski, Dr. Theodore John, ADX Florence [that's the federal prison -- I looked it up], PO Box [I'll omit that], Florence, CO 81226. EL [Eliot House] AB 62." There's also a class directory that comes out every 5 years, which is sent only to members of that class -- I was in the class of 1965, so I don't have K,'s class directory. I guess this would be his 50th reunion year. There's probably also something on-line, but I don't use that.

Scott said...

This "news" is two months old. Check the dateline.

khesanh0802 said...

I spent a lot of time looking at the Memorial Hall names in of those who died in the civil war. They are carved on plaques along all the walls in the chronological order of battles. I can attest that Harvard members of the Confederate army are included along with those members of the Union army. When I first began to study the inscriptions I was surprised by how many Confederates there were who had attended Harvard.

There are many things about Harvard that we can laugh about, and I agree that since the 60's the number of Harvard students in the military has not been commensurate with the privilege of attending such a prestigious American Institution. You should be aware that there is a very active group of ex-military alumni that work hard to remind the administration of that. Their pressure has led to the return of ROTC to the Yard.

As a side note Harvard can claim the highest number of Medal of Honor winners outside of the service academies and it was also the home of the first ROTC unit.

Chip Ahoy said...

* grabs chair *

He's still alive?

* looks around *

Crimso said...

Reminds me of the time I noticed there was a guy posting on the Matrix Games forums (fora?) by the name of Jonathan Pollard. He lists his location as "Federal prison." I assume it really is him.

gadfly said...

It is somewhat interesting that Mr. Barack H. Obama II didn't register with the Harvard Alumni Directory until December of 2003, just ahead of his run for U.S. Senate. He made some change in September of 2008 while in the throws of his Presidential Election campaign and he changed his prefix to President in December of last year.

No formal press release or grinding and gnashing of teeth occurred on these dates - and I am sure that there are Harvard Alumni who are forever crimson-faced about his association with their University.

LarsPorsena said...

"...It also points out that In 1863, there were fewer than 2,700 living graduates of Harvard College. More than half of them enlisted..."

You don't have to worry about that every happening again. What ever spirit animated those grads died long ago.

Ralph L said...

I'm sure TK just wants to hear from old friends.

Teddy Roosevelt's father paid a substitute, which may partly explain TR's martial vigor. R. E. Lee's 2nd son was also a graduate and also a Confederate general.

Comanche Voter said...

He earned those life sentences. No one else did it for him.

My very liberal sister tells me "You know, the statement you didn't earn that was taken out of context". Out of context my bleeding fanny!

You ought to let grown men--including the Bamste and Kacynski (now there's a two horse parlay--both destructive creatures) own the words they said--and the deeds they did.

Ann Althouse said...

"I know you've discussed the topic. I'm just not convinced by the arguments extending the definition of censorship to include acts by private actors, particularly in a publishing/editorship context. From what I've seen, extending the definition muddies free speech concepts more than it clarifies them. For example, the decision by a private actor to not publish something may itself be an act of speech on its part."

It's an integral part of human life. You're always in the position of expressing yourself and maybe repressing others. When you speak, are you cutting someone else off? A dominating speaker can be doing something wrong in terms of etiquette or ethics. It's important to think about freedom in a broader way. How are you limiting the freedom of others? Even as you do things you are free to do, you may be disrespecting another person's interest in freedom. You should think about that. The fact that no one can go to court over it does not absolve you of the responsibility to pay attention to what you do to others.

Ann Althouse said...

"This "news" is two months old. Check the dateline."

I saw it. So what? I was interested in the story that I ran across and hadn't blogged before. Had you seen it?

Maguro said...

Thank god that somefeller showed up to remind everyone that he's an Ivy Leaguer of some sort. I'd almost forgotten.

Crimso said...

"Teddy Roosevelt's father paid a substitute, which may partly explain TR's martial vigor."

TR and his son were both Medal of Honor recipients (I don't think you "win" one of those). There was one other father/son recipient combo. It's a name you know.

Fen said...

It seems to me this could be a source of fraud, allowing persons to represent themselves as members of a university when they are not.

Not fraud. Not according the logic of 8 Harvard/Yale Supreme Court Justices. If someone is legally allowed to fraudulently claim MOH status, they are able to claim themselves alumni of Harvard too.

Me,I was Chief Justice back in the day.

fivewheels said...

Does it happen to mention that he's Native American? If so, maybe we could go to lunch.

bagoh20 said...

I think Ted gives the alumni a good reminder that it's not their education that makes a graduate substantial, respectable, or good, but rather what he does with it...or without it for that matter.

tiger said...

I, too, agree with the professor.

Ralph L said...

TR and his son were both Medal of Honor recipients
I knew about Jr and Normandy, but I hadn't about Sr. Wiki says he was nominated after San Juan Hill but disapproved at the time. An award in 2001, a hundred years later--and after a popular presidency--seems a bit fishy.

Arthur and Douglas MacArthur are the other pair, for those too lazy to look it up.

David said...

Somefeller, my statement about Confederates being the majority of Harvard enlistees in the Civil War was incorrect. And by a long shot. I do apologize for the misinformation.

It's hard to find the exact numbers, and interestingly a web search does not easily yield (to me) a list of Union or Confederate soldiers or casualties. A fairly recent book entitled Crimson Confederates concluded that there were about 360 Confederate soldiers from Harvard. One source I saw said that there were 1662 people with Harvard "ties" who enlisted overall, so about 20% seem to have been Confederate soldiers. There are 136 Union dead listed in Memorial Hall. Contrary to what someone said above, all were Union. The notion of including Confederate dead has been debated off and on for over 100 years, and will probably be debated for 100 more.

Crimson Confederates counted 72 from Harvard who died in service to the south.

So perhaps one can say that southerners served and died in disproportionately high numbers, but even that is unclear. The rest of what I said was simply wrong. I do not recall where I got the mistaken idea.

Ken said...

Ann,

Take responsibility for it all.

Be serious. You're talking about lefties. The entire agenda for lefties is to take absolutely no responsibility for anything and to ignore any facts that might ruin the fantasy world in which lefties live.

khesanh0802 said...

I was incorrect. Shows how little a freshman understands.