February 6, 2013

"The Kanem Empire originated in the 9th century AD to the northeast of Lake Chad."

"Historians agree that the leaders of the new state were ancestors of the Kanembu people. Toward the end of the 11th century the Sayfawa king (or mai, the title of the Sayfawa rulers) Hummay, converted to Islam. In the following century the Sayfawa rulers expandeded southward into Kanem, where was to rise their first capital, Njimi. Kanem's expansion peaked during the long and energetic reign of Mai Dunama Dabbalemi (c. 1221–1259)."

 

In Chad, today's "History of" country.

15 comments:

Methadras said...

Yeah, Islam really hasn't done them any favors I imagine.

bagoh20 said...

This history stuff is all about the killin, ain't it? You could describe it as a bunch of these people sang some wierd ass music, danced around, screwed a lot, and ate everything in sight, and then some other people came along with some sucky music and did it on their turf, and then later, some other people with some better music did the same, and here we are today.

ricpic said...

No hanging chad jokes!

campy said...

With those masks on the spear-carriers, we can't see their dimples!

campy said...

I'm sure those Chads are all for Gore!

edutcher said...

More French Equatorial Africa.

Last I heard M L'Inspecteur Reynaud was down there.

With some guy named Rick.

n.n said...

The history of slavery in Africa realized its greatest progress with the expansion of Islam.

Oh, well. There are no people who seek to consolidate capital and power who are free from sin. While Islam is a notoriously left-wing philosophy, the corruption of men, and women, was certainly not limited to establishment of monopolies or monopolistic practices. Everyone seeks to gain leverage of one kind or another, to a lesser or greater degree.

Mitch H. said...

Recent linguistic research suggests that all of Africa's major language groupings south of the Sahara Desert [...] originated in prehistoric times in a narrow band between Lake Chad and the Nile Valley.

It sounds plausible, but how did they establish that? The research which established that Romany is an Indian language had to do with tying it linguistically with a number of other languages still in the subcontinent, I don't see how you assign linguistic geography without those fossil languages in place... well, damn. Look at all those. How the hell do you maintain 120 distinct languages in four different linguistic families with a population of 11 million moving around on an essentially featureless plain?

Chad seems to have stolen all of the Central African Republic's missing history, look at all that! I wasn't aware the tsetse fly's range extended as far north as Chad. Africa would have been a much different place if horses or some sort of horse-like creature could have been domesticated in the tsetse region.

kentuckyliz said...

Tsetse Rider

See what you've done?

furious_a said...

Oops, wrong Chad.

kentuckyliz said...

Wow...did you read about the charity nags who abducted 103 Chadian children and pretended they were Darfur refugees?

Zoe's Ark

Makes that nutty guy who just died seem like a piker.

furious_a said...

I remember the technicals from the Libya-Chad War.

Gimbal-mounted quad Shkas 12.7s in the bed, who wouldn't want one?

ironrailsironweights said...

Snow occasionally falls on the summit of Emi Koussi, which is Chad's highest mountain at an elevation of 11,300 feet. Snow is unknown in the rest of the country.

Peter

CWJ said...

I thought this yesterday when I saw the meaningless kalaidoscope that passes for the Central African Republic's flag. That Chad was the next country in line merely reinforced the impression.

Why do we treat any of these countries as modern western nation states? Seriously. I don't mean this disrespectfully. There is nothing inherently superior to the concept outside of the European nations and culture that gave it birth. Its just that all these entities in Africa with fixed borders seem so artificial.

And yet at the same time as their leaders and apologists decry the legacy of colonialism, they would seem willing to fight to the death to preserve their arbitrary colonial borders and institutions.

Paul Brinkley said...

@CWJ: I suspect they learned just enough about western culture to realize the parts that would get them free stuff: selling resources they control, and making Westerners feel guilty about it.

One thing I notice about Chad is that Google Maps has no photos whatsoever of its capital. Another thing I notice is that it appears to have very, very few paved roads. They must have some, of course; they have some fairly modern looking buildings, and their airport is paved. But the "suburbs"? No. Nothing against the people, personally, but modernity has yet to reach some surprising locations.